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CODE APPROVALS

Underwriters Laboratory

When commercial builders see the many advantages of a Sprayed Polyurethane Foam roofing system -- such as energy efficient insulation and wind uplift protection -- they want it on their buildings. Now they can have it. The SPF roofing system assembly has fire-resistance ratings that meet or exceed building code requirements for most every type of commercial structure and type of occupancy.

Architects and Engineers: Specify, a Sprayed Polyurethane Foam roofing system in your plans -- Design No. P733, as described in the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. Fire Resistance Directory. Regional pre-safety requirements may vary, so please check your local building code for compliance.

The Sprayed Polyurethane Foam roofing assembly was tested for fire resistance in accordance with the UL263 testing method. Initially, a series of small-scale fire tests were done to qualify individual polyurethane foam manufacturers and to derive data for use in conjunction with the full-scale assembly test at Underwriters Laboratories Inc. Based on analysis of the full-scale test results, UL promulgated the P733 fire-resistance design with hourly ratings shown here.

Graveled Urethane foam passes the Class A (over non-combustible & combustible decks) fire test in accordance with Underwriters Laboratories test standard UL 790.

WIND UPLIFT RESISTANCE AND STRUCTURAL QUALITY

Excellent
   
According to Underwriters Laboratories Inc., the direct application of Sprayed Polyurethane Foam to steel deck and plywood deck demonstrated uplift load resistance (160-165 psf) without any sign of delamination or other damage to the foam. Sprayed Polyurethane Foam results in a highly rigid. monolithic (continuous) roof surface with no joints or seams, which helps SPF roofing systems resist wind uplift.

Factory Mutual

Meets FM Research Corporation Standard 4470 for Class I Fire, Windstorm and Hail Classification. In Factory Mutual's Class I-SH simulated hail test procedure, a 1-3/4 inch steel ball weighing 0.79 pounds was dropped from a height of 17 feet 9-1/2 inches, generating an impact energy of 14 foot-pounds. Passing a test calls for the ball to be dropped at least 10 times without causing any evidence of damage.


ASSOCIATIONS

  • Performance Based Studies Group @ASU Del E Webb School of Construction
  • SPI Society of Plastics / Contractor Division
  • NRCA National roofing Contractors Association
  • ASA American Subcontractors Association
  • AGC Associated General contractors Association

 


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